@reiver

The Social Brain Hypothesis

A key initial insight into human evolution was the idea that the primary selective pressures shaping human cognitive development may be social rather than ecological (Emery 2000). This idea can be traced to Chance and Mead (1953), Jolly (1966), Humphrey (1976; 1983), Alexander (1989), and Brothers (1990), who have suggested that living in large, complex groups, under strong within-group and between-group social competition for resources and mates, has selected for a “social brain,” functionally designed by evolution mainly for solving social problems.

[...]

Alexander, R. D. [...] (1989) Evolution of the human psyche. In: The human revolution: Behavioural and biological perspectives on the origins of modern humans, ed. P. Mellars & C. Stringer, pp. 455 – 513. Edinburgh University Press. [aBC]

[...]

Brothers, L. (1990) The social brain: A project for integrating primate behavior and neurophysiology in a new domain. Concepts in Neuroscience 1:27 – 51. [aBC]

[...]

Chance, M. R. A. & Mead, A. P. (1953) Social behaviour and primate evolution. Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology 7:395– 439. [aBC]

[...]

Emery, N. J. (2000) The eyes have it: The neuroethology, function and evolution of social gaze. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 24:581 – 604. [aBC]

[...]

Humphrey, N. K. (1976) The social function of intellect. In: Growing points in ethology, ed. P. P. G. Bateson & R. A. Hinde, pp. 303 – 17. Cambridge University Press. [aBC]

[Humphrey, N. K.] (1983) Consciousness regained. Oxford University Press. [aBC]

[...]

Jolly, A. (1966) Lemur behaviour. University of Chicago Press. [aBC]

[...]

-- Bernard Crespi , Christopher Badcock

from "Psychosis and autism as diametrical disorders of the social brain"

Quoted on Sun Jul 1st, 2012