@reiver

Briefcase Syndrome Of Creativity

First, teachers' unwelcoming attitudes [to creative students] may alienate [creative] children from formal education. It has also been clearly demonstrated that children's performance is affected by teachers' attitudes toward them (Brophy & Good, 1970; Kenealy et al., 1991; Rosenthal & Jacobson, 1968). A second possible outcome is that teachers' dislike of behaviors associate with creativity leads to the extinction of those behaviors. Thus, potentially creative students might learn to conform so as to improve the teacher-student relationship. This attempt to appease the teacher and do better in the classroom could cause children to suppress the very characteristics that make them creative. A third possibility is that certain students are capable of adjusting to the demands of the teacher while continuing to maintain creativity. The teachers' incorporation of desirable behavioral characteristics within their concept of creativity may well act as a filtering system. This filter may wallow only the most behaviorally adaptable creative students to succeed within the traditional system. People who fit this pattern may account for a subset of creative people who have sometimes been referred to as displaying the "briefcase syndrome of creativity" (MacKinnon, 1983, p. 123). These individuals simultaneously display the characteristics most often associated with creativity as well as characteristics such as deliberate, reserved, and industrious, which run counter to a more bohemian notion of creativity (e.g., Becker, 1983).

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Becker, G. (1983). The mad genius controversy. In R. S. Albert (Ed.) Genius and eminence (pp. 36-39) New York: Pergamon.

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Brophy, J. E., & Good, T. L. (1970). Teachers' communication of differential expectations for children's classroom performance: Some behavioral data. Journal of Educational Psychology, 61, 365-374

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Kerealy, P., Frude, N., & Shaw, W. (1991). Teacher expectations as predictors of academic success. Journal of Social Psychology, 131, 305-306.

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MacKinnon, D. W. (1983). The highly effective individual. In R. S. Albert (Ed.), Genius and eminence (pp. 114-127). New York: Pergamon.

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Rosenthal, R., & Jacobson, L. (1968). Pygmalion in the classroom: Teacher expectation and pupils' intellectual development. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

-- Erik L. Westby , V. L. Dawson

from "Creativity: Asset of Burden in the Classroom?"

Quoted on Mon Jan 16th, 2012