@reiver

Reason Used To Seek Truth Is A Spandrel?

The idea, labeled the argumentative theory of reasoning, is the brainchild of French cognitive social scientists, and it has stirred excited discussion (and appalled dissent) among philosophers, political scientists, educators and psychologists, some of whom say it offers profound insight into the way people think and behave. The Journal of Behavioral and Brain Sciences devoted its April issue to debates over the theory, with participants challenging everything from the definition of reason to the origins of verbal communication.

"Reasoning doesn't have this function of helping us to get better beliefs and make better decisions," said Hugo Mercier, who is a co-author of the journal article, with Dan Sperber. "It was a purely social phenomenon. It evolved to help us convince others and to be careful when others try to convince us." Truth and accuracy were beside the point.

[...]

What is revolutionary about argumentative theory is that it presumes that since reason has a different purpose -- to win over an opposing group -- flawed reasoning is an adaptation in itself, useful for bolstering debating skills.

Mr. Mercier, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, contends that attempts to rid people of biases have failed because reasoning does exactly what it is supposed to do: help win an argument.

"People have been trying to reform something that works perfectly well," he said, "as if they had decided that hands were made for walking and that everybody should be taught that."

-- Patricia Cohen

from "Reason Seen More as Weapon Than Path to Truth"

Quoted on Sat Jun 25th, 2011