@reiver

I've wondered how much of in-group / out-group behavior is a result of kin recognition adaptations being tricked

Adaptations for kin recognition can be tricked. (For example, we do it to dogs.)

I've wondered how much of in-group / out-group behavior you see (in humans) is a result of kin recognition adaptations being tricked.

Kind of like how incest avoidance adaptations can be tricked. The Kibbutz and Chinese shim-pua marriage examples being somewhat "famous" examples of incest avoidance adaptations being tricked.

There are obviously different types of in-group / out-group behavior. And there may be differences between them.

You might suspect some of it may be due to coalitional behavior. And you might also suspect some of it may be due to reciprocal altruism.

But maybe not all of it.

Maybe for some of the in-group / out-group behavior you see, some part of it involves mistaken kin recognition. And thus, kin recognition adaptions being tricked.

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